Repair: Cine-Nikkor 13mm f/1.8

Hello, everybody! Do you remember Fred Rogers? He is an amazing person who seem to see something good in all of the things that happen in this world. When an awful situation happens it’s nice to remember him and his show. There’s also a good story by Ajahn Brahmawanso about how he almost destroyed a brick wall just because there’s brick that’s not looking quite right. What stopped him was the thought that it’s not worth destroying a whole wall just for a single brick since the rest are obviously fine. In this life we’re sometimes faced with annoyance and it’s important to see some good in any situation. Today, I will show you a similar situation, I’ve received an item that is in otherwise good state but it has a blemish. Since it still sort of works fine I just focused on that fact instead of that blemish.

Introduction:

The Cine-Nikkor 13mm f/1.8 was sold from an unknown date. Judging from the types of the boxes I’ve seen these were probably sold from the 1960s to around the latter part of the 1970s and even possibly up to the 1980s. I’ve seen beige and even blue boxes for these. This lens filled an important part in Nikon’s C-mount lens catalog, it gives you a similar field-of-view of a 35mm lens on full-frame. While f/1.8 may sound bright it’s actually rather dim, being merely an f/4.8 lens in actual practice. You’ll have to remember that the 16mm format is smaller than 35mm so it gathers less light and you won’t get shallow depth-of-field with it unless you used a super-fast lens.

The barrel is engraved with all sorts of informative scales that will be useful for operating this lens. The mount is special in the sense that you can adjust its orientation so the centerline of the barrel will be visible to you. This is essential, not all camera brands will allow you to mount these lenses similarly so the ability to adjust its orientation is important.

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Review: Yama Uchu-no-Katasumi 400

Hello, everybody! The pandemic has affected every person I know, mostly negatively. It has certainly affected our craft, we now have less opportunities to take photos. This sort of dampened my passion so I’m restricted to taking boring or repetitive photos. I’ve recently discovered a new film which I haven’t used or heard yet. It’s not expensive but it’s not a cheap stock either so I thought that I’d probably give it a shot. To my surprise, it’s actually rather nice and it has helped me enjoy photography again.

Introduction:

Today, we’ll take a look at Uchu-no-Katasumi (宇宙の片隅) or “A Corner of the Universe” in English. It’s made by Irohas, a small photography company based in Gunma, north of Tokyo. If you’re shopping for used cameras and lenses you’ve probably saw their name in the online auction sites. Click on this link to go to their website. This film is sold under their Yama brand, think of it as a Japanese equivalent of that big company that sells plastic cameras to people who pay a lot for a cup of drinkable cakes. Go to the Yama website to see what they’re all about.

What took my attention was the color of the box and its corny art. The name is also intriguing which made me curious. I was compelled to buy it because it’s priced decently at $6.50 for a 24-shot roll. I said decent since it should be sold at a lower price because it’s just 24-shots, if it’s 36-shots then you wouldn’t hear anything from me. I hate 24-shot rolls, I have to pay the same price to process and scan it compared to a 36-shot roll.

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